Today’s reading.

Could be worse for my first week, tbh

First day: +5 textbook chapters of reading.
I heard a heartbeat through a stethoscope and seriously took someone’s blood pressure for the first time in my life today.

Noragi all day erryday while it’s still crazy hot outside and super cold in every room of the OT department.

Bad late-night photos because I didn’t leave campus til 7pm.

Oh, life, you so crazy.

First day: +5 textbook chapters of reading.
I heard a heartbeat through a stethoscope and seriously took someone’s blood pressure for the first time in my life today.

Noragi all day erryday while it’s still crazy hot outside and super cold in every room of the OT department.

Bad late-night photos because I didn’t leave campus til 7pm.

Oh, life, you so crazy.

First day: +5 textbook chapters of reading.
I heard a heartbeat through a stethoscope and seriously took someone’s blood pressure for the first time in my life today.

Noragi all day erryday while it’s still crazy hot outside and super cold in every room of the OT department.

Bad late-night photos because I didn’t leave campus til 7pm.

Oh, life, you so crazy.

Pretty dingy, but those layers are cool as hell to me.

(Source: cavanmccarthy, via thebeaconofgondor)

WIWT: was handed a 165-page booklet to read in the next few days on top of everything else. I didn’t sleep last night. Grey on grey because look at my noragi.
I am so done right now.

putthison:

Uniqlo Fits Short, Slim People … For Now

PRI reports that Uniqlo’s expansion into the US hasn’t been very successful, partly because Americans are having a difficult time fitting into clothes originally sized for the Japanese market. An excerpt: 

And Uniqlo’s US operations aren’t doing so well. They have more than 25 stores on both coasts and they’re collectively losing money for the company. One of their biggest challenges in breaking into the US mainstream market is sizing.

Yuya Tanahashi, Uniqlo’s Boston area manager, calls it an ongoing struggle for the brand. “We are actually analyzing every year about the fit,” he says. 

Basically, they’re checking sales data in each of their stores around the world, including here in Boston. We’re going to try to find the best fit for the Boston customers as well by analyzing what items sell and what sizes sell,” Tanahashi says.

Uniqlo is looking into changing the sizes they offer in the US. In their words, they’re figuring out how to provide “a more ‘3D’ fit” for American shoppers.

So all those glorious form-flattering Smalls in the Boston store? They may not be small for long. But Tanahashi did offer me this: “We have kids line as well, and many adults actually purchase [clothes from the] kids line, meaning the boys and the girls style. So I would try to recommend the girls style as well.”

You can read the rest here

Hit the gym, folks, I’m short and relatively skinny and uniqlo is one of the only stores I can rely on to carry everything in my size

Dinner tonight (not exactly instagram worthy, I know): penne in homemade cream sauce with broccoli, sun dried tomatoes, and carrots, and lemon and garlic herb chicken. It took a dutch oven and a skillet, but it was still pretty minimal effort on my part.

putthison:

Actual Japanese Workwear

Check out these absolutely stunning Japanese firemen coats. Known as Hanten coats, these were worn by Japanese firefighters in the 19th century. At the time, the technology to spray water at a high-enough pressure hadn’t been invented yet, so Japanese men had to fight fires by creating firebreaks downwind. Doing so, however, put them in danger of catching on fire themselves, as hot embers can travel up to a mile. To make their coats more protective, they were continually doused with water. 

The symbols and designs you see are for several things. Some are just for decoration, of course, while some signal the fire crew that the wearer belonged to. Others are lucky symbols or refer to a heroic story, giving the wearer encouragement to be strong and courageous. 

You can see these coats in person (along with many other awesome things) at Shibui, a shop in New York City for Japanese antiques and collectibles. They’re moving at the end of September and are having a sale right now to lighten their load. Select items are discounted by up to 50%, including lots of boro fabrics, which is a kind of heavily patched and mended Japanese textile. You can see examples of boro here.

For those of us outside of NYC, Shibui has a Google+ page you can admire (they’ll take phone orders, if you’re interested). There’s also a book titled Haten and Happi, which is all about traditional Japanese work coats. 

/swoon

putthison:

Fake Deals

Medium has a story today on the less-than-honest business practices of discount and outlet stores. An excerpt: 

Despite common belief, outlet clothing never enters a “regular” store and is most likely produced in an entirely different factory than the “regular” clothing. A few months ago I met with some people from Banana Republic Outlet. Banana Republic has a team of people whose sole responsibility is to design and manage production for their outlet stores. Their production team was looking for new ways to diversify their outlet product-line in order to compete with H&M and Zara. It is rumored that these huge retailers have such agile supply-chains that they are able to bring new product to their stores every 2 weeks. While Banana Republic and J.Crew are not trying to compete on price with H&M, their outlet counterparts must. This means that these companies produce lower cost and lower quality clothing specifically for their outlet stores.

[…]

TJ Maxx, known for it’s off-price designer labels, finds itself in a similar position. Ever notice that TJ’s will have a surplus of Calvin Klein, or Rachel Roy, or Elie Tahari clothing? This happens when TJ Maxx brokers a licensing deal with one of these brands. In this situation, the brand (ex: Calvin Klein) agrees to let TJ Maxx produce clothing with their label on it in return for a percentage, usually between 5-20% of the wholesale price of the garment. To put this in perspective, in 2012 Calvin Klein reported that “licensed products currently represent slightly over 50% of global retail sales.” At that time, licensing alone accounted for more than $3.8 billion in CK sales.

Licensing can be a great situation for the brand because they do not have to manage sourcing, production, or shipping. TJ Maxx, or the licensee, manages all of the nitty-gritty stuff, and makes the product in their factories at prices that they control. Then, they put the reputable brand label on the clothing and write that company a check. These branded garments end up at discount retailers and consumers buy them thinking that they’ve just scored an awesome Calvin Klein blazer.

You can read the rest of the article here. To figure out which outlet stores are worth visiting, you can read Jesse’s post from four years ago (as far as I know, all those recommendations are still good). He also has a great post on diffusion lines and licensed clothing

Holy shit.

On my mind: this denim dress from Land’s End. Don’t ask why.

Links later, when I’m in front of an actual computer.